Concerning the Book Living Language Dothraki and the Dothraki Language with a Response from the Khal

James E. Hopkins received a BA in French from Hofstra University in 1974 and an MS in Metaphysics from the American Institute of Holistic Theology in 1998. He is a published poet, Eden’s Day (2008), and has a novel which features five of his conlangs, Circle of the Lantern, with the publisher as of this writing. He has been involved in language construction since 1995 with the birth of his first conlang, Itlani (then known as Druni). Although Itlani is his first and foremost love, since that time he has been developing Semerian (Pomolito), Djiran (Ijira), Djanari (Nordsh) and Lastulani (Lastig Klendum), the other languages spoken on the planet Itlán. One further language project, Kreshem (Losi e Kreshem), is also under development. His primary interest in language construction is from an aesthetic and artistic perspective.

David J. Peterson received a BA in English and Linguistics from UC Berkeley in 2003 and an MA in Linguistics from UC San Diego in 2005. He created the Dothraki and Valyrian languages for HBO’s Game of Thrones, the Castithan, Irathient and Indojisnen languages for Syfy’s Defiance, the Sondiv language for the CW’s Star-Crossed, the Lishepus language for Syfy’s Dominion, the Trigedasleng language for the CW’s The 100, and the Shiväisith language for Marvel’s Thor: The Dark World. He’s been creating languages since 2000.

Abstract

James Hopkins wrote a review of David Peterson’s Living Language Dothraki in his language Itlani and sent it to David. David then responded in Dothraki. The exchange included herein has an English translation to go along with it.

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An interview with David J. Peterson and Sai Emrys about Dothraki and the Language Creation Society

Jim Henry was born in 1973 in Decatur, Georgia, and has lived in the Atlanta area most of his life. He started creating constructed languages in 1989 after discovering Tolkien’s Quenya and Noldorin (in The Book of Lost Tales rather than his better-known works), but his early works were all vocabulary and no syntax. In 1996, after discovering Jeffrey Henning’s conlang site and the CONLANG mailing list, he started creating somewhat more sophisticated fictional languages; and in 1998, he started developing his personal engineered language gjâ-zym-byn, which has occupied most of his conlanging energies since then, and in which he has developed some degree of fluency. He retired recently after working for some years as a software developer, and does volunteer work for the Esperanto Society of Metro Atlanta, Project Gutenberg, and the Language Creation Society.

Abstract

Jim Henry interviews David J. Peterson and Sai about their involvement in HBO’s Game of Thrones.

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An Interview with Paul Frommer

Fredrik Ekman is a middle school language teacher living in Sweden. He has previously worked as a free-lance journalist, specializing in computers and information technology. Fredrik’s interest in constructed languages is mainly focused on artistic conlangs, and on conlangs as a tool for teaching and learning. He has also written about Edgar Rice Burroughs, and has been called “a premier Swedish ERB collector and scholar”. He is a contributing member of the Edgar Rice Burroughs Amateur Press Association (ERB-APA), and he often writes in that forum about the languages invented by Burroughs.

Abstract

During the past three decades, several languages have been created for movies and tv series. One of the most well-known is Klingon (Star Trek). As of March 2012, the latest example is Barsoomian, created by Paul Frommer (well-known for designing the Na’vi language spoken in Avatar) for the movie John Carter. The movie is adapted from Edgar Rice Burroughs’ 1912 novel A Princess of Mars, and the language is based on the Martian words found in that novel and its ten sequels. In this interview, one of his first about this new language, Frommer talks about the background and process of developing the language, as well as some of its linguistic features.

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