Victoria Fromkinʼs Reform-Pakuni of 1995

Thomas Alexander has been interested in languages since his youth. He has a minor in German, spoke Esperanto as a home language for a number of years, and has dabbled in well over a dozen other languages. His conlanging interest is primarily in historical auxlangs, including Volapük and the Zamenhof reform Esperanto of 1894, but with fond memories of Saturday morning television, he also enjoys Pakuni from Land of the Lost.

Abstract

Victoria Fromkin’s Pakuni language was released to the world through the 1974 TV series Land Of The Lost but it wasn’t till more than 20 years later that she released a lexicon and grammatical description of the language. This description was not widely distributed and contains a number of self-described ‘corrections’ to the language as it appeared in the show. It also contains a surprising number of typos and internal inconsistencies. This article discusses those errors and contrasts the language Fromkin described in 1995 to the language seen in the show, and puts Fromkin’s later description in the context of what insight it can give to fans of the show.

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Comprehensive Illustrated Pakuni Dictionary

Thomas Alexander has been interested in languages since his youth. He has a minor in German, spoke Esperanto as a home language for a number of years, and has dabbled in well over a dozen other languages. His conlanging interest is primarily in historical auxlangs, including Volapük and the Zamenhof reform Esperanto of 1894, but with fond memories of Saturday morning television, he also enjoys Pakuni from Land of the Lost.

Abstract

Pakuni was developed by the late Victoria Fromkin and was used in the 1970’s TV program Land of The Lost by Sid and Marty Kroft. A complete description of the language as used in the show has never been published, and a lot of the information on the internet included errors or words that were made up by fans later and were not part of the original conlang. This dictionary is the result of putting together the word lists that had been compiled or published previously and compared to a corpus of carefully transcribed examples of Pakuni from the show. The dictionary includes examples of how the words were used in the show and/or what episode the words were used from.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.