Patterns of Allophony

By day, William S. Annis is a mild-mannered Unix system administrator. By night (and most weekends) he is, by turns, a not very mild-mannered banjo player, a hobbyist language creator, a paid language creator, a reader of science fiction novels and linguistics papers, a terrible gardener, and an ok cook. He is one of the hosts of the Conlangery Podcast. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

Abstract

In this paper, William S. Annis illustrates the most common sound changes that occur with vowels, stops, fricatives and sonorants. This information is presented in graphical form, so readers can see what happens with each sound in a variety of circumstances. This paper should be useful to those evolving sound systems for naturalistic conlangs.

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Siinyamda

Britton Watkins began his career in high tech in his native South Carolina before moving to Japan for much of the 1990s, where he worked for the Japanese company Mitani Shōji, the Apple subsidiary Claris, and eventually the German e-commerce infrastructure software firm, Intershop in various management roles. Since leaving Intershop and returning the to the US, Britton has been and independent consultant specializing in market strategy research and communication strategies for companies like Adobe, Fujitsu and Sony. In 2010 he became interested in conlanging and specifically the intersections of conlanging and film production. Most recently he’s also branched out into filmmaking itself with his husband of 12 years in the roles of writer, producer and art direction/production design.

In addition to his native Southern American English Britton is comfortable communicating in Japanese, Spanish and Na’vi, which was his first major “gateway language” into conlanging. He’s also studied Thai, Mandarin, French, some Latin and Cherokee. His core passions lie in orthography but he loves everything about human (and alien) language and in 2012 was very pleased to teach Zoë Saldana and several other Klingons their lines for Kronos in the JJ Abrams production, Star Trek Into Darkness.

Siinyamda is Britton’s first foray into fleshing out a conlang of his own design to the extent that it might begin to work for everyday communication and he is hopeful that it will live beyond the film for which it was created, Senn.

By day, William S. Annis is a mild-mannered Unix system administrator. By night (and most weekends) he is, by turns, a not very mild-mannered banjo player, a hobbyist language creator, a paid language creator, a reader of science fiction novels and linguistics papers, a terrible gardener, and an ok cook. He is one of the hosts of the Conlangery Podcast. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

Abstract

DISCLAIMER: The following document includes topics not suitable for all ages and language not suitable for work (NSFW). Reader discretion is advised.
Siinyamda was created for use in the independent film “Senn” (2013). In addition to a grammar, lexicon and brief texts for the language, this paper discusses the design process for both the language and the writing system, and how that process was shaped by the needs of the film. The fictional internal history of the language is also described. The paper ends with examples of the several typefaces developed for the writing system.

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A Conlanger’s Thesaurus

By day, William S. Annis is a mild-mannered Unix system administrator. By night (and most weekends) he is, by turns, a not very mild-mannered banjo player, a hobbyist language creator, a paid language creator, a reader of science fiction novels and linguistics papers, a terrible gardener, and an ok cook. He is one of the hosts of the Conlangery Podcast. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

Abstract

A Conlanger’s Thesaurus is a basic wordlist which has been annotated with notes on common paths of grammaticalization, cross-linguistic polysemy and other information mostly from the work of lexical and semantic typologists. The collection itself isn’t innovative in any way, but rather collects this information in a convenient format. Its intended use is to act as a guard against relexing your native tongue in your conlang.

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Afrihili: An African Interlanguage

By day, William S. Annis is a mild-mannered Unix system administrator. By night (and most weekends) he is, by turns, a not very mild-mannered banjo player, a hobbyist language creator, a paid language creator, a reader of science fiction novels and linguistics papers, a terrible gardener, and an ok cook. He is one of the hosts of the Conlangery Podcast. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

Abstract

Historically, the creation of IALs has been a European preoccupation. Afrihili is an African zonal IAL created by Ghanaian civil engineer K. A. Kumi Attobrah in the late 1960s. After a brief discussion of Afrihili’s relationship to Pan-Africanism, I move on to a survey description of the language based on the single published description of the language, Ni Afrihili Oluga. I identify the source languages for vocabulary and particular constructions where I have been able to locate them.

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